Kinnis Gosha, PhD

Morehouse College CS Department

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CRCL Presents Research Paper at the 2018 RESPECT Conference

 

The research paper entitled “Awareness and Readiness for Graduate School of African American Male Computer Science Students” was accepted into the 3rd Annual Conference for Research on Equity & Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, & Technology (RESPECT) hosted in February 2018 in Baltimore, MD.  Congratulations to the authors Earl Huff Jr. and Dr. Kinnis Gosha on their achievement. The paper provided significant insight into African American computer science students’ confidence levels, academic and technical capabilities,  limitations of assistance, and likelihood in pursuing graduate education.

Mays High School and CRC Lab Awarded Grant from the State of Georgia

The Culturally Relevant Computing Lab and Benjamin E. Mays High School were selected as one of the six partnerships to receive the Innovation Fund Tiny Grant for 2017, with the award received being $6998.  The goal of the Innovation Fund Tiny Grant was to develop programs in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). With this grant students will be provided mentors to help guide them through their virtual AP Computer Science courses. In addition to those students participating in the program, student enrolled in Georgia Virtual AP Computer Science and AP Computer Science Principles courses will also benefit from the Tiny Grant through tutoring and assistance.

CRCL Awarded $157k for Cyber Security

The Culturally Relevant Computing Lab has been awarded a contract by Clarkson Aerospace, LLC to conduct research in the area of cybersecurity. The research will be conducted primarily by members of Morehouse College, Spelman College and Clark Atlanta University Navy ROTC. The contract is set at $157,000 and runs for nine months. The research to be conducted will be in the area of social media data analysis and mining.

NSF Grant Awared for Minority Faculty Mentorship Program

Dr. Kinnis Gosha, the founder of the Culturally Relevant Computing Lab at Morehouse College, will serve as co-Principal Investigator of the Increasing Minority Presence within Academia through Continuous Training (Impact) grant.  This $299,856 award, funded by the National Science Foundation, Inclusion Across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (INCLUDES) program, is led by Georgia Institute of Technology, as a multi-institutional partnership. The focus of this project is to “impact the engineering faculty ecosystem by demonstrating a new method of support and engage diverse engineering faculty through retired and emeriti faculty who may have preceded them in their chosen field of study,” according to Dr. Comas Haynes of the Georgia Tech Research Institute.

Morehouse College Offers Android Programming and Exposure to Coding Culture

Culturally Relevant Computing Lab Director, Dr. Kinnis Gosha, and Google software engineers, developed a course for Morehouse students to learn Android Application programming, along with the Applied Computer Science(CS) content, and received hands-on experience in a for-credit class.  The course, titled “Mobile App Development with Advanced Data Structures,”combined lecture, class discussion and in-class assignments targeted at learning Java, advanced data structures, ADS, and other basics for Android programming.  The Applied CS classes ran for 75 minutes and were held twice a week for 16 weeks in the fall semester of 2016. These classes, the first at the university for mobile app development, filled up quickly due to the buzz around the collaboration with Google, and 11 out of 12 students successfully completed the course. Applied CS content enabled students to understand, apply and implement advanced data types using a mobile application platform that more than two billion devices run on today.

HBCU CS Faculty Participate in Google’s Faculty in Residence Program

Dr. Kinnis Gosha is one of the 31 HBCU Computer Science faculty members selected for the inaugural  HBCU Faculty in Residence program. Over 20 HBCUs are represented in this six-week program at Google’s world headquarters in Mountain View, California. Faculty will work to redevelop curriculum to better align with the latest trends in software engineering.

CRC Lab and APS Collaborate on Coding Summer Program

It is no secret the demand for people with information technology and computing skills is growing nationwide, and it is never too young to learn the necessary skills to help land you a career in that field.

Morehouse College and Atlanta Public Schools are doing their part to expose high school student to computing careers through a 4-week coding workshop.

The Xanadu-Computer Application Development Summer Program will be offered to rising 10th-12th grade students from June 5 through June 29.

“This program will provide a unique opportunity for students in the Atlanta metropolitan area to learn computer science even if these courses are not offered at their respective high schools,” said X-Capp co-founder and Morehouse College computer science professor Dr. Kinnis Gosha. “Having computer science training in high school increases the likelihood of retaining students who major in computer science at a significantly higher probability.” ?

During the camp, students will also be able to familiarize themselves with various computing careers through the ComputingCareersNow.org portal which was developed by Gosha in the Morehouse College Culturally Relevant Computing Lab.

“The ideal students for the X-Capp program are high achieving students who have shown and communicated a strong interest in computer science,” explains Atlanta Public Schools’ Gifted and Talented Education Coordinator, Dr. Quail T. Arnold. “This enrichment opportunity will help students explore a field of interest and further prepare them for college and/or career,”

For more information about X-Capp, please visit http://www.atlanta.k12.ga.us/Page/911 or contact the Xanadu Middle/High Program at 404-802-7585.

Read more: http://www.cbs46.com/story/35535818/morehouse-college-aps-partner-for-summer-computing-camp#ixzz4iVW1DDD2

See the original CBS46 News Story here.

CRC Lab Presents at Regional Conference

Four members of the Culturally Relevant Computing Lab presented their research this weekend at the ACM Southeast Conference. The title of the poster presentation was entitled “Introduction to Computer Science for Urban African American Students Using Sphero Robotics Workshop”. The four students consisted of Trey Ridley, Ernest Holmes, Kevin Womack and Jordan Scott from Morehouse College. An abstract from the submission is provided below:

This paper introduces the use of an all-day coding workshop as an intervention to introduce and expose African American high school students from a southeastern urban school district to coding and computing careers. The workshop is held at a local HBCU and led by African American undergraduates computer science majors who attend that HBCU. The workshop is focused on a robotic ball called an Sphero that allows users to control its motion and color by writing lines of code. Results from workshop showed an increase of interest in pursuing a career in computing after graduation compared to interest before the start of the workshop.

South Atlanta High School Attends Sphero Coding Workshop

A group of 25 students from South Atlanta High School participated in the Sphero Coding Workshop today at Morehouse College. Students learned how to write code in in the morning session, ate lunch in Morehouse’s Dining Hall and competed against each other in coding challenges in the afternoon. The Sphero Coding Workshop is lead by Dr. Kinnis Gosha and his Culturally Relevant Computing Lab. The Culturally Relevant Computing Lab is represented by students from Morehouse College, Spelman College and Clark Atlanta University. Sponsorship for the workshop was provided by Boeing and the National Science Foundation.

Gosha Interviewed on Georgia Public Radio

Dr. Kinnis Gosha was interviewed by Georgia Public Broadcasting on his work funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiatives Annual Reporting Tool, built by Gosha and his research lab, handles the annual data reporting and visualization for over 200 youth detention center across the nation. Hear the interview here.

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