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Research

New Book Chapter Focused on Virtual Mentoring

In October of 2020, a new book was released by Kendall Hunt Publishing Company entitled, “Navigating the Peer Mentoring Relationship: A Handbook for Women and Other Underrepresented Populations in STEM”. Congratulations to Dr. Kinnis Gosha for co-authoring chapter 8 entitled “Using Virtual Platforms to Facilitate Peer Mentoring Relationships”.

Navigating the Peer Mentoring Relationship: A Handbook for Women and Other Underrepresented Populations in STEM Book Cover
Navigating the Peer Mentoring Relationship: A Handbook for Women and Other Underrepresented Populations in STEM Book Cover

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Funded Grants Research

New Grant Awarded to Support the STARS Computing Corps

The CRCL was awarded $749,949 by the National Science Foundation for the grant titled, “The STARS Aligned: How the STARS Computing Corps Broadens Participation in Computing”. The primary research aim of this grant (NSF #2022660) is to investigate research questions around the impact of the STARS Computing Corps Alliance on its past and current efforts to broaden participation in computing. CoPI Gosha’s role in the grant is crucial in ensuring inclusion of HBCUs into the STARS ecosystem.

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Research

Director’s Manuscript Accepted by the ACM Special Interest Group on Management Information Systems 2019 Computers & People Research Conference

Dr. Kinnis Gosha, Culturally Relevant Computing Lab (CRCL) Director, manuscript submission titled, “Improving Computing Science Instruction for African American Secondary School Students: A Focus Group Exploration of Computing Identities of African American Teachers” was  accepted into the 2019 ACM SIGMIS Computers and People Research (CPR) Conference. This conference will be held June 20-22 in Nashville, Tennessee.

The ACM Special Interest Group (SIG) on Management Information Systems (MIS) promotes best-practice and research in the management of information systems and technologies in management commerce. SIGMIS is a founder of ISWorld Net at www.isworld.org, and a sponsor of several conferences on information systems and technology. As one of the oldest of ACM’s SIG’s, SIGMIS traces its beginnings back to 1961, and for forty years has been instrumental in defining and developing the field of management and information systems.

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Research

The 2019 Human Computer Interaction International Research Acceptance

Researchers from the Culturally Relevant Computing Lab (CRCL) in the Computer Science Department at Morehouse College recently submitted an abstract titled, “Exploring the Needs and Preferences of Underrepresented Minority Students for an Intelligent Virtual Mentoring System” to the 2019 HCI International Conference. Their abstract was accepted as a poster for publication in the conference proceedings and presentation. The authors of this abstract are Naja A. Mack, Research Scientist; Earl W. Huff Research Scientist; Robert Cummings, Postbaccalaureate Researcher; and Dr. Kinnis Gosha, Hortenius I. Chenault Endowed Associate Professor and Director of Non-Traditional Academic Initiatives.

The HCI International 2019 is the 21st International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. It will take place July 26th-30th at the Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Orlando area, Florida, USA, under the auspices of 18 distinguished international boards.

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Funded Grants Research

Morehouse College Awarded $1.5 Million for HBCU STEM Identity Research Center

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) has identified research in broadening participation in STEM as one of its priorities and is committed to funding innovative models and research to enhance the understanding of the barriers that hinder and factors that improve and increase our ability to broaden participation in STEM.

The project at Morehouse College has been designed to initiate the implementation of essential research that will set the foundation for the development of the theoretical model for resilient science identity formation. The project in collaboration with Virginia State University and several other other HBCU institutions is designed to strengthen education research capacity by implementing a comprehensive faculty development program.

The goal of the HBCU Identity Research Center for STEM (Award #1818458) is to establish the foundational tenets of the theoretical model for resilient science identity formation. The project will achieve this goal through:

  1. Research activities that will contribute to an increased knowledge base on science identity formation and other psychosocial constructs that promote the creation of a resilient identity and ultimately success and retention in STEM.
  2. Education activities that contribute to learning about the experiences and accomplishments of STEM education at HBCUs.
  3. Knowledge translation activities that will facilitate the development of an intellectual infrastructure to ensure mutually beneficial communication and collaboration between individuals to propagate ideas and discover new research opportunities in the science of broadening participation.
  4. Outreach activities to all stakeholders and the broader academic community to engage in project activities and to inform the higher education community.

The project will impact the research training and education of thousands of students, hundreds of faculty, and the academic community at large about the science of broadening participation in general and identity formation specifically.

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Research

CRCL Presents Research Paper at the 2018 RESPECT Conference

 

The research paper entitled “Awareness and Readiness for Graduate School of African American Male Computer Science Students” was accepted into the 3rd Annual Conference for Research on Equity & Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, & Technology (RESPECT) hosted in February 2018 in Baltimore, MD.  Congratulations to the authors Earl Huff Jr. and Dr. Kinnis Gosha on their achievement. The paper provided significant insight into African American computer science students’ confidence levels, academic and technical capabilities,  limitations of assistance, and likelihood in pursuing graduate education.

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Research

CRC Lab Presents at Regional Conference

Four members of the Culturally Relevant Computing Lab presented their research this weekend at the ACM Southeast Conference. The title of the poster presentation was entitled “Introduction to Computer Science for Urban African American Students Using Sphero Robotics Workshop”. The four students consisted of Trey Ridley, Ernest Holmes, Kevin Womack and Jordan Scott from Morehouse College. An abstract from the submission is provided below:

This paper introduces the use of an all-day coding workshop as an intervention to introduce and expose African American high school students from a southeastern urban school district to coding and computing careers. The workshop is held at a local HBCU and led by African American undergraduates computer science majors who attend that HBCU. The workshop is focused on a robotic ball called an Sphero that allows users to control its motion and color by writing lines of code. Results from workshop showed an increase of interest in pursuing a career in computing after graduation compared to interest before the start of the workshop.

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Research

Paper Accepted to Top Computer Science Education Conference

A manuscript co-authored by Dr. Kinnis Gosha entitled “Holistic Development of Underrepresented Students through Academic – Industry Partnerships” has been accepted for publication in the conference proceedings of the ACM Special Interest Group for Computer Science Education Conference. The conference will be held in Seattle, Washington on March 8th – 11th, 2017. Co-authors include Marlon Mejias (Howard University), Legand Burge (Howard University), Kamar Galloway (Google) and Jean Muhammad (Hampton University). More information about the conference can be found at http://sigcse2017.sigcse.org.

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Research

A Qualitative Analysis of Using a Virtual Mentoring Program on Black Computer Science Students

A new journal has been accepted for manuscript in the International Journal of Education and Human Developments. Dr. Juan Gilbert and Morehouse Junior, Kamal Middlebrook, are co-authors.

Abstract

It has been a major goal of the United States government to increase the participation of Americans in the fields of Science & Engineering (S&E), especially in under-represented groups. This research examines the use of an embodied conversational agent (ECA) as a virtual mentor to African American undergraduates who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in computing. Mentoring advice was collected from a group of experts and programed within the ECA. A between-group, mixed method experiment was conducted with 37 African American male undergraduate computer science majors where one group used the ECA mentor while the other group pursued mentoring advice from a human mentor. Results showed no significant difference between the ECA and human mentor when dealing with career mentoring functions. However, the human mentor was significantly better than the ECA mentor when addressing psychosocial mentoring functions.

Citation:

Gosha, K., Gilbert, J., Middlebrook, K. (2016) A Qualitative Analysis of Using a Virtual Mentoring Program on Black Computer Science Students. International Journal of Education and Human Developments (ISSN: 2334-2978), 5(1).